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Two Most Dangerous Words in Nutrition

I just got back from Long Beach California at the Perform Better conference.  I’ve been fortunate to be on their speaking circuit for the last 3 years; it’s truly one of the best conferences for those in the fitness industry, from the speakers, attendees and organizers.

gluten free dietI spoke this weekend about "Hot Trends in Nutrition" to a packed room of about 400 strength coaches and trainers from around the world.  We talked about fun stuff like gluten, the Paleo Diet, intermittent fasting and so much more.

While there, I also of course sat in on many other lectures and workouts to continue to get better myself.

One other speakers — Martin Rooney — said something that I really liked.

He talked about two dangerous words.  I’ll get even more specific and say the two most dangerous words in nutrition, though these could be applied to anything.

Any guesses?

Here’s a hint:

  • Not ‘trans fat’
  • Not ‘sugar & carbohydrates’
  • Not ‘soft drinks’
  • Not ‘egg yolks’

Here are the two words.  THEY SAY.

THEY SAY carbohydrates are bad for you (they’re wrong, when you choose the right type)

THEY SAY I should give up gluten (not unless you’re intolerant)

THEY SAY fat is unhealthy (not when you choose the right fats)

THEY SAY eating egg yolks is dangerous (nope, wrong again).

THEY SAY all calories are created equally (100 calories from soda = 100 calories from blueberries?  Get real)

First, who is "THEY?"  Second, "THEY" are often wrong so don’t believe ‘em.

When talking this weekend I touched on the topics I mentioned above and many more.  And the questions kept coming up. 

For example, I brought up the hot topic of intermittent fasting.  Someone raised his hand and said "BUT I read if you fast for 14 hours each day it will positively affect your hormones and boost fat loss."

In other words, "THEY SAY."

The problem is "THEY SAY" a lot and are usually trying to sell you something. 

You have to do you own research.  Experiment yourself.  Base your findings on what really works, what’s not based on "THEY SAY" and actually formulate your own thoughts and opinions.

If we only focused on what THEY SAY — we’d be running in circles. 

Let’s go back to the egg example.  THEY SAY egg yolks will cause heart disease.

It was once thought that cholesterol causes heart disease.  Therefore, because egg yolks are high in cholesterol, eating egg yolks causes heart disease.

This couldn’t be further from the truth.

Egg yolks are amazing for you and have much more nutrition than just the whites.  The yolks carry all the important vitamins, minerals and more protein.  So if you follow what "THEY SAY" you’ll be tossing away all that goodness and eating just the whites.

I remember a nutrition professor of mine — we’ll call her "Dr THEY SAY" who said that people should throw out the yolks but not give them to their dogs, as many were doing at the time, so they didn’t get wasted.  But then her vet reported all these cases of heart disease in dogs!

Again, THEY SAY.

We could go on.  Butter and margarine.  Fat in the diet.  Carbohydrates.

If you read too much you’re bound to find conflicting information.  Ask 10 different people how they feel about carbohydrates and fat and you’ll likely get 10 different answers leaving you even more confused.

Don’t listen to what "THEY SAY" — find a trusted source of information, do what works for you and you’ll get results.  Those who read too much, listen to too much won’t know what to believe and will be left confused.  When left confused, that means one thing.

Inaction.

And at the end of the day, if you don’t take action, you won’t get results.

Do us a favor and click the like button below if you enjoyed this article and believe "THEY SAY" might just be the two most dangerous words in nutrition.

10 Responses to Two Most Dangerous Words in Nutrition

  1. Mark August 13, 2012 at 10:43 am #

    Good stuff Chris. Humans, only species on the planet that needs “they say” to tell them what to eat, for what should be a natural thing.

  2. sean August 13, 2012 at 11:19 am #

    Thank you for the great article. I agree that it is important to have credible sources and to remember them.

    People often say… “They say” because they can’t remember where they read it or if they have taken bits of info to suit their own assumptions.

    Keep up the great emails!
    Regards
    Sean

  3. Richard Messer August 13, 2012 at 12:25 pm #

    Great post Chris, I sat in Martin Rooney’s class and that was one of my take aways as well “THEY SAY”. I used it this morning in one of my classes. Your lecture was just as amazing and I am glad I had the opportunity to hear you speak. You are right on with your subject “Sorting Through the Confusing World of Nutrition”. Just this morning in a conversation with a client she said, “Oh I only eat egg whites, I don’t want my cholesterol to go up” another “THEY SAY”.

    There was one phrase you mentioned I can’t remember and I could not find it in my notes. It was in regards to eating organic. Something about if fresh organic was not available then___. O maybe about affordability. I believe you mentioned you got it from some else. Hope you can remember. Thanks

  4. Richard Messer August 13, 2012 at 12:25 pm #

    Great post Chris, I sat in Martin Rooney’s class and that was one of my take aways as well "THEY SAY". I used it this morning in one of my classes. Your lecture was just as amazing and I am glad I had the opportunity to hear you speak. You are right on with your subject "Sorting Through the Confusing World of Nutrition". Just this morning in a conversation with a client she said, "Oh I only eat egg whites, I don’t want my cholesterol to go up" another "THEY SAY".

    There was one phrase you mentioned I can’t remember and I could not find it in my notes. It was in regards to eating organic. Something about if fresh organic was not available then___. O maybe about affordability. I believe you mentioned you got it from some else. Hope you can remember. Thanks

    • Chris and Kara Mohr August 13, 2012 at 12:37 pm #

      I appreciate the kind words and thanks for sitting in on my presentation. You’re likely referring to when I said “eat what you can afford.”

  5. Tracy August 13, 2012 at 1:00 pm #

    Hi Chris and Kara,

    Excellent article. I cannot click on the like button, I do not do facebook so I can’t click on it.
    I have a “they say” to ask about. It’s canola oil. I have heard that it is one of the best to cook with and healthy. I just read an article that says it’s one of the worst. Since I do trust in what you say, I am asking for your advice on this. Thanks for the article, it is so very true.

    Thanks,
    Tracy

    • Chris and Kara Mohr August 14, 2012 at 1:58 pm #

      It’s a healthy option in our opinion.

      • Mark August 14, 2012 at 2:05 pm #

        But, aren’t there better options… grass-fed butter, coconut oil, macadamia nut oil… Just curious as to when canola oil would be preferential over the above.

        • Chris and Kara Mohr August 15, 2012 at 9:39 am #

          It’s the lowest edible source of saturated fat. I don’t believe saturated fat is the be all/end all, but at the same time there’s enough solid data that suggests we shouldn’t use it as our sole source of fat. I like olive, canola too.

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